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The Well of Experience - Abadoss' Mind
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Tue, May. 16th, 2006 12:39 am
The Well of Experience

I have little respect for the music that is coming out of popular culture today. It's not because it isn't fulfilling the purpose for which it is made, - as a product for entertainment, consumed by millions of people - but because it fails to explore the domain in which it exists. If an artist decided to draw with crayons on napkins, I'm only going to have a certain level of respect for him or her if that artist were skilled and versed in, for instance, oil portraits or frescoes. It's not just because oil portraits or frescoes create a credibility for the artist. It's because having the skills to create on such a level that is required for those more demanding artforms demonstrates that drawing with a crayon on a napkin is a choice rather than a limitation of that artist knows how to do.

Gustav Mahler, a very profound and tragic composer, once said that the life of an artist cannot be separated from his or her art. I believe this to be true in the case of any artist. An artist, drawing on a napkin with a crayon, brings to his or her drawing all of the experiences and life into that piece of work. It's true that many great artists had no professional training and taught themselves. However, in almost all cases, they developed their own sense of discipline for their artform. Their art is significant and remembered, not because of its precision or skill, but because of the life - their life - that they bring to it. There is no such thing as objective art. Even if we invented a computer to make art for us, it is still tainted because we built the machine to perform a task of our making.

One thing that all the masters of the past and present have in common, is that they were and are aware of the developments within their current time and the times of their predecessors. Masters of art who are considered greatest and best in their field will defer to those that they thought were the greatest and best. They found inspiration from the world of art that existed before they arrived on the scene. To their art, they not only brought their own life, but they also brought the lives of everyone that had influenced them. Works of art by these masters are so incredibly powerful because of the deep well of experience - that of their own and of those that influenced them.

The music of popular culture seems to lack that depth of experience. Musicians scorn the well of experience that had been dug through stone and rock for millennia, just to drink from muddy puddles in the street. Only once and a while will a musician abandon the puddle for a watery pothole. It's like the idea of drawing water from the well is too difficult to be worth it and they'd rather satisfy their need with the puddle. They draw with crayons because its all they know how to do and they refuse to learn how to do anything else. I'd have an easier time appreciating a crayon drawing from a four year old. At least I'd know that there's potential to grow and I would want to support that development. I have no attachment to a crayon drawing by someone of my own age, if they weren't capable or even aware of much more. I'd sooner accept the child's drawing over theirs.

It saddens me. It saddens me because I know that very soon, I'll be in this world of puddle drinkers. I will have to fight my way to be noticed and, unless I figure out a way to get a hose down the well or create the Mona Lisa in crayon, I'm going to be forgotten by this generation. My affect on this world will be delayed beyond my time, if at all. And this is a disturbing thought.

Tags: , ,
Current Mood: contemplative contemplative
Current Music: "Requiem - Agnus Dei" -Wolfgang Amedeus Mozart

3CommentReplyShare

samhobbits
samhobbits
This is where Maria talks about life
Fri, May. 19th, 2006 09:40 pm (UTC)

Last night I bought a book you will be very interested in. It is by an author with the name of Pratchett.


I'll let you know when I finish. *is excited*


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abadoss
abadoss
Kenneth Edward Keyn
Sat, May. 20th, 2006 12:56 am (UTC)

Ooh! Most interested am I! :D


ReplyThread Parent
justjuls
Julie
Tue, May. 30th, 2006 08:54 pm (UTC)

"I'd have an easier time appreciating a crayon drawing from a four year old. At least I'd know that there's potential to grow and I would want to support that development. I have no attachment to a crayon drawing by someone of my own age, if they weren't capable or even aware of much more. I'd sooner accept the child's drawing over theirs."

Good point and well said!


ReplyThread